Fine Art

Readers' Review: "The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison

Readers' Review: "The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison

September 24, 2014

For our next Readers’ Review: “The Bluest Eye” by Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison. Set during the Depression, it tells the story of a young African-American girl who thinks blonde hair and blue eyes are the key to a better life. Join us for a discussion of Morrison’s first novel, “The Bluest Eye.”

Miles J. Unger: "Michelangelo: A Life in Six Masterpieces"

Miles J. Unger: "Michelangelo: A Life in Six Masterpieces"

July 24, 2014

Michelangelo created some of the most celebrated works in the history of Western art, including the Pieta, David and the Sistine Chapel: his life, legacy and how he revolutionized the role of art in society.

Natalie Merchant on Her New Self-Titled Album "Natalie Merchant"

Natalie Merchant on Her New Self-Titled Album "Natalie Merchant"

July 2, 2014

A conversation with Natalie Merchant about her new album, her first release of original music in 13 years.

Linda Przybyszewski: "The Lost Art of Dress"

Linda Przybyszewski: "The Lost Art of Dress"

June 11, 2014

An historian recounts the story of the Dress Doctors, a group of women who taught America how to dress in the first half of the twentieth century.

A Special Readers' Review: A Celebration Of Poetry

A Special Readers' Review: A Celebration Of Poetry

April 23, 2014

A special Readers' Review: three poets join Diane to help mark national poetry month. They'll read their own work, discuss their inspirations and talk about the role poetry plays in society.

The Challenges Of Claiming Nazi-Stolen Artwork

December 10, 2013

Germany recently published details about more than 100 artworks, including pieces by Picasso and Cézanne, discovered in Munich as part of a huge stash of suspected Nazi loot. Diane and her guests discuss why so little has been done to return stolen goods to Holocaust victims and their families and what this incident means for institutions and collectors in the U.S.

Jonathan Jones: "The Lost Battles"

Jonathan Jones: "The Lost Battles"

October 29, 2012

Art historian and critic Jonathan Jones details the fierce 16th century competition in Florence, Italy, between Leonardo da Vinci and his much younger rival, Michelangelo.

Andrew Graham-Dixon:  "Caravaggio" (Rebroadcast)

Andrew Graham-Dixon: "Caravaggio" (Rebroadcast)

December 28, 2011

Caravaggio was dead before he was forty. But in his short life he managed to turn art on its head. His passion for light defined 17th century art and a generation of artists that followed. But he lived his life in the shadowy world of criminals, pimps and prostitutes. Joining us to discuss the man and his art, is Andrew Graham-Dixon, author of “Caravaggio: A Life Sacred and Profane”.

Andrew Graham-Dixon:  "Caravaggio"

Andrew Graham-Dixon: "Caravaggio"

November 16, 2011

Caravaggio was dead before he was forty. But in his short life he managed to turn art on its head. His passion for light defined 17th century art and a generation of artists that followed. But he lived his life in the shadowy world of criminals, pimps and prostitutes. Joining us to discuss the man and his art, is Andrew Graham-Dixon, author of “Caravaggio: A Life Sacred and Profane”.

Steven Naifeh:  "Van Gogh: The Life"

Steven Naifeh: "Van Gogh: The Life"

October 24, 2011

Nineteenth-century artist Vincent van Gogh is remembered for his madness as much as his art. The authors of a new biography offer fresh perspectives on both.

Our address has changed!

The Diane Rehm Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.