Arts & Culture

Readers' Review: "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding

September 21, 2005

Diane leads a discussion of this provocative 1954 classic about a group of schoolboys marooned on a tropical island without adult supervision.

Hilary Spurling: "Matisse the Master" (Knopf)

September 20, 2005

The second of a two volume biography of one of the twentieth century's most important and influential artists.

Elie Wiesel: "The Time of the Uprooted" (Knopf)

September 14, 2005

The Nobel Prize winning author of more than 40 books presents his latest work of fiction. It features a Holocaust survivor confronting the emotional cost of displacement.

Salman Rushdie: "Shalimar The Clown" (Random House)

September 13, 2005

The author presents his latest novel. It deals with the roots of terrorism as seen in the aftermath of the Kashmir conflict, when the fates of a World War II resistance hero and a Kashmiri dancing girl converge.

Chris Roberts: "Heavy Words Lightly Thrown" (Gotham)

September 12, 2005

A look at the real story behind some of the best known and most beloved nursery rhymes.

Michael Kimmelman: "The Accidental Masterpiece" (The Penguin Press)

September 8, 2005

The chief art critic of the New York Times explains how art can help us lead fuller lives. He also examines the lives of some who made art their life's work.

Joshua Bell

September 7, 2005

Virtuoso violinist Joshua Bell joins Diane to talk about his performance career, the classical music audience, and his new live performance recording of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D.

U.S. Poet Laureate Ted Kooser (Rebroadcast)

September 5, 2005

The poet laureate of the United States joins Diane to talk about how to go from wanting to be a poet to actually writing poetry.

Gene Wilder: "Kiss Me Like A Stranger" (St. Martin's) (Rebroadcast)

September 1, 2005

The star of such classic film comedies as "The Producers," "Young Frankenstein," "Blazing Saddles," and "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" talks about a side of his life the public hasn't seen on...

Elizabeth Kostova: "The Historian" (Little, Brown) (Rebroadcast)

August 31, 2005

One of the summer's hottest reads is a first novel by a woman who wrote in obscurity for ten years. She talks with Diane about writing a fresh take on the Dracula legend as seen through the eyes of scholars.

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The Diane Rehm Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.