People sign documents March 9 to show their support for the Venezuelan government after the United States imposed sanctions on Venezuelan officials over rights abuses.

People sign documents March 9 to show their support for the Venezuelan government after the United States imposed sanctions on Venezuelan officials over rights abuses.

Friction between the U.S. and Venezuela has been intensifying for months. But this week it got decidedly worse. The White House declared Venezuela a national security threat and sanctioned seven top officials. Critics of the U.S. actions said Venezuela’s socialist president, Nicolas Maduro, would use the sanctions to his advantage. He has accused the U.S. of trying to topple his government and blamed the U.S. for his nation’s faltering economy. Cuba came to Venezuela’s defense, further complicating U.S. policy in the region. Join a discussion of the escalation of U.S.-Venezuelan tensions – and what’s at stake.

Guests

  • Michael McCarthy research fellow at American University's Center for Latin American Studies; former Fulbright and Inter-American Foundation fellow in Caracas.
  • Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez a geopolitical-risk analyst based in Chicago, where he teaches Latin American business at the Kellogg School of Management. He is a weekly political columnist for the Venezuelan newspaper El Nacional.
  • Mark Weisbrot co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research. He has written about the Venezuelan economy for the past decade and is the author of the forthcoming book "Failed: What the 'Experts' Got Wrong About the Global Economy."

Related Links

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Readers’ Review: “Drown” by Junot Diaz

Wednesday, Jun 29 2016For this month's Readers' Review: "Drown" -- the debut collection of short stories by Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Junot Diaz. Twenty years ago, Diaz published ten heart-breaking tales about a fragmented family from the Dominican Republic finding their way in 1980s America.

What Brexit Means For The U.S.

Tuesday, Jun 28 2016With a now-likely U.K. exit from the EU, America’s relationship with a key intelligence and global trade ally will change. Please join us to discuss what the British vote means for the U.S. economy, the 2016 presidential campaign and global security.