Paratroopers from the 3rd Battalion Parachute Regiment, soldiers from the U.S.-led Task Force Paladin and an unidentified U.S citizen from Dallas, Texas, center, working as a civilian contractor to advise the U.S.-led Task Force Paladin, take part in an operation to search three compounds and look for weapons in Salavat, Panjawi Province, Afghanistan.

Paratroopers from the 3rd Battalion Parachute Regiment, soldiers from the U.S.-led Task Force Paladin and an unidentified U.S citizen from Dallas, Texas, center, working as a civilian contractor to advise the U.S.-led Task Force Paladin, take part in an operation to search three compounds and look for weapons in Salavat, Panjawi Province, Afghanistan.

In World War II, contractors made up just 10 percent of the military workforce; by the Iraq war, that number had risen to 50 percent. And that number is climbing – not just in the U.S. but worldwide, as governments look to save money and keep casualty numbers down for their own militaries. But what does this trend toward private-run warfare mean for the future of international relations? One former contractor warns that armies-for-hire will soon be the norm, making it easier than ever to wage war. What an increased reliance on private armies could mean for modern warfare and global security.

Guests

  • Sean McFate senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. Former paratrooper in the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division, and former private military contractor in Africa.

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Maya Angelou: “Mom & Me & Mom” (Rebroadcast) – And Diane Signs Off

Friday, Dec 30 2016Maya Angelou came onto this program several times over the years. But in her last conversation with Diane, in 2013, she talked about writing about her fraught relationship with her mother for the first time. Her last words to Diane: “I love you, Diane Rehm. And I look forward to seeing you and talking to you again and again.” A year later, she died at the age of 86. In one of Diane's most treasured interviews, the women reflect on forgiveness, healing and reconciliation.