Guest Host: Susan Page

US President Barack Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto (L) at the Palacio de Gobierno del Estado de Mexico in Toluca, Mexico, on February 19, 2014.

US President Barack Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto (L) at the Palacio de Gobierno del Estado de Mexico in Toluca, Mexico, on February 19, 2014.

As Republicans took control of Congress yesterday, President Barack Obama turned his focus to foreign policy by welcoming Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto to the White House. The two leaders discussed immigration, trade, Cuba and crime. President Obama pledged to stand with Mexico against “the scourge of violence and drug cartels.” Protesters outside demanded that the U.S. push the Mexican president to do more to stop corruption and drug-related violence in his country. Peña Nieto praised Obama’s new immigration action and his plans to normalize relations with Cuba. Guest host Susan Page and her guests discuss the latest on U.S. relations with Mexico.

Guests

  • Arturo Valenzuela Senior International Advisor, Covington & Burling; Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs in the first Obama Administration
  • Manuel Suárez-Mier Director, Center for North American Studies, American University
  • Eric Olson Associate Director, Latin America Program, Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars
  • Shannon O'Neil Senior Fellow, Latin America Studies, Council on Foreign Relations; author of "Two Nations Indivisible: Mexico, the United States, and the Road Ahead"

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