Boxes of strawberries sit amongst bags of trash found by "Freegans" outside of a grocery store in New York.

Boxes of strawberries sit amongst bags of trash found by "Freegans" outside of a grocery store in New York.

Up to 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. With it, we throw away more than $ 160 billion and huge quantities of natural resources. But while wasted food rots in landfills and emits greenhouse gases, millions of Americans face hunger and global demand for food continues to rise. From farming and distribution to restaurants and homes, experts say there are opportunities for improvement at every level of the food supply chain. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: the causes and consequences of food waste, and how to change our path.


  • Dana Gunders staff scientist for the Natural Resources Defense Council; author of the upcoming book "Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook”
  • Laura Abshire director of sustainability at the National Restaurant Association
  • Elise Golan director of sustainable development for the USDA
  • Tristram Stuart founder of the food waste campaigning organization Feedback; author of “Waste: Uncovering the Global Food Scandal”

Video: The Global Food Waste Scandal

In this TED talk, Tristram Stuart says we should make better use of global resources when it comes to food.

Food Waste In Restaurants

Food Waste At The Market

Food Waste In Manufacturing

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