America is becoming a country with no racial majority. In 2009, for the first time in U.S. history, more minority than white babies were born in a year. Soon, most American children will be racial minorities. The nation’s diversity surge played a key role in Barack Obama’s election as president. Many see these trends as necessary as a much-needed younger minority labor force is already boosting an aging baby boom population. But challenges loom, including clashes over public resources, overcoming a cultural generation gap, and fears over losing privileged status. Diane and her guests discuss how new racial demographics are remaking America.

Guests

  • Jamelle Bouie Slate staff writer covering politics, policy, and race.
  • Mark Hugo Lopez director, Hispanic trends, Pew Research.
  • William Frey senior fellow, Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution; author of "Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics Are Remaking America."
  • Jim Tankersley economic policy correspondent, The Washington Post; editor of the "Storyline" policy blog

The Fastest-Growing Minority Cities In America

A Brookings Report compiled a list of the cities in which minority populations are booming:

Hispanics

  1. Charlotte
  2. Raleigh
  3. Nashville
  4. Indianapolis
  5. Atlanta
  6. Cape Coral
  7. Las Vegas
  8. Lakeland
  9. Orlando
  10. Portland

Asians

  1. Las Vegas
  2. Raleigh
  3. Charlotte
  4. Atlanta
  5. Austin
  6. Orlando
  7. Phoenix
  8. Indianapolis
  9. Nashville
  10. Tampa

Blacks

  1. Las Vegas
  2. Minneapolis-St. Paul
  3. Phoenix
  4. Orlando
  5. Atlanta
  6. Raleigh
  7. Charlotte
  8. Riverside
  9. Tampa
  10. Dallas

Maps: A Closer Look At America's Integration

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