A close up taken on March 12, 2014 at the University Hospital in Dijon, eastern France, shows a 3D printer used for the reproduction of the skull of a patient. Dijon's pioneer surgery service uses a 3D printer to prepare tailored facial implants with greater precision, and to reduce operation length.

A close up taken on March 12, 2014 at the University Hospital in Dijon, eastern France, shows a 3D printer used for the reproduction of the skull of a patient. Dijon's pioneer surgery service uses a 3D printer to prepare tailored facial implants with greater precision, and to reduce operation length.

Bioengineers are creating human body parts to replace organs and manage life-threatening diseases. How techniques like 3-D printing and stem cell research are driving medical advances and raising ethical questions

Guests

  • Dr. Anthony Atala director, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine; and professor and chair, Department of Urology at Wake Forest University
  • Debra Mathews, Ph.D. assistant director for science programs, Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics
  • Dr. Jason Spector director, Laboratory for Bioregenerative Medicine and Surgery and associate professor, plastic surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College (NYC)

Related Links

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Maya Angelou: “Mom & Me & Mom” (Rebroadcast) – And Diane Signs Off

Friday, Dec 30 2016Maya Angelou came onto this program several times over the years. But in her last conversation with Diane, in 2013, she talked about writing about her fraught relationship with her mother for the first time. Her last words to Diane: “I love you, Diane Rehm. And I look forward to seeing you and talking to you again and again.” A year later, she died at the age of 86. In one of Diane's most treasured interviews, the women reflect on forgiveness, healing and reconciliation.