Left to right, Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y., and Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., and other members of the House of Representatives return to their offices after final votes on Capitol Hill. Leaders passed an "omnibus" bill to keep Cabinet agency operations running through the Sept. 30 end of the 2015 budget year.

Left to right, Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y., and Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., and other members of the House of Representatives return to their offices after final votes on Capitol Hill. Leaders passed an "omnibus" bill to keep Cabinet agency operations running through the Sept. 30 end of the 2015 budget year.

In a rare Saturday session, the Senate approved a $1.1 trillion spending bill. The House narrowly passed the measure earlier in the week. Massive in scope, the bill funds the government through September 2015. Three controversial provisions in particular have received a lot of attention by editorial boards of the nation’s leading newspapers. One puts the pensions of more than a million workers at risk. Another weakens Wall Street regulations. And a third raises limits on donations to political parties. We discuss arguments for and against those provisions – and why they matter.

Guests

  • Michael Greenberger founder and director, University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security and professor, University of Maryland Carey School of Law; former director of Trading and Markets at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC).
  • Kevin Hassett director of economic policy studies, American Enterprise Institute.
  • Annie Lowrey staff writer, New York magazine.
  • David Leonhardt editor of The Upshot, a New York Times website covering politics and policy; author of the e-book: “Here’s the Deal: How Washington Can Solve the Deficit and Spur Growth."

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