Concerns About New Part-Time Work Trends and Proposed Remedies (Rebroadcast)

A job-seeker (L), speaks to a counselor a state-sponsored career and job resource fair in Denver, Colorado for the unemployed and underemployed. - Photo by John Moore/Getty Images

A job-seeker (L), speaks to a counselor a state-sponsored career and job resource fair in Denver, Colorado for the unemployed and underemployed.

Photo by John Moore/Getty Images

Concerns About New Part-Time Work Trends and Proposed Remedies (Rebroadcast)

More than seven million Americans can find only part-time work when they would rather work full-time. Concerns about unpredictable hours, on-call shifts and proposed remedies.

The number of people working part-time who would rather work full-time is almost double what it was seven years ago at 7 million people. Despite signs of economic recovery, many businesses say they are still struggling and depend on part-time workers, especially those who work on-call. New federal data show that almost half of all part-time workers under age thirty-two work unpredictable hours, leaving them with reduced paychecks and scrambling for child-care. A discussion about the latest trends in part-time work and the push for new laws that protect employees.

Guests

Carrie Gleason

director, Fair Workweek Initiative at the Center for Popular Democracy.

Aparna Mathur

resident scholar in economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute.

Susan Lambert

associate professor, School of Social Service Administration, The University of Chicago.

Rep. Rosa DeLauro

U.S. Congresswoman, representing Connecticut's 3rd district; co-chair of the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee.

Information Source: Schedule Unpredictability Among Early Career Workers in the US Labor Market:A National Snapshot by
Susan J. Lambert, Peter J. Fugiel and Julia R. Henly, University of Chicago

New Research On Part-Time, On-Call Workers

Research by University of Chicago. Infographic by The Center for Popular Democracy
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