Assessing Police Practices And The Use Of Deadly Force

Police watch as demonstrators protest the shooting death of Michael Brown along West Florissant Avenue on August 23, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri.   - Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

Police watch as demonstrators protest the shooting death of Michael Brown along West Florissant Avenue on August 23, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

Assessing Police Practices And The Use Of Deadly Force

The killing of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri renews questions about police practices and the use of deadly force: why some say Brown's death could spark a broader debate in US police strategies.

In St. Louis, Missouri, thousands of people gathered Aug. 25 for the funeral service for Michael Brown. He was fatally shot by a police officer earlier this month. His death is being investigated by a St. Louis grand jury and also by the Justice Department. Police use of deadly force is, unfortunately, not uncommon, but some say the killing of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, and police reaction to subsequent protests may lead to a far broader examination of police policy, community relations, politics and race. Join us to discuss the new questions following the death of Michael Brown.

Guests

Fredrick Harris

professor of political science,
director, Center on African American Politics and Society,
Columbia University

William Yeomans

fellow, law and government, American University's Washington College of Law

Tracie Keesee

co-founder,Center for Policing Equity
25 year police veteran

Bill Lewinski

behavioral scientist specializing in law enforcement related issues
executive director, Force Science Institute

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