An Update On The Environmental Effects Of Fracking

Pump jacks and wells are seen in an oil field on the Monterey Shale formation where gas and oil extraction using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is on the verge of a boom near McKittrick, California. - David McNew/Getty Images

Pump jacks and wells are seen in an oil field on the Monterey Shale formation where gas and oil extraction using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is on the verge of a boom near McKittrick, California.

David McNew/Getty Images

An Update On The Environmental Effects Of Fracking

A recent study blames fracking for earthquakes in Oklahoma while another warns of risks to drinking water. Diane and her guests discuss what the latest research says about how fracking affects the earth - and what can be done about it.

Each year an estimated 35,000 oil and natural gas wells are processed using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. More than 15 million people live within a mile of a well that’s been drilled since 2000. The explosive growth in this industry has left scientists struggling to keep up, but research is beginning to mount related to how fracking is affecting the earth. A recent study connected fracking to increased earthquakes in Oklahoma and Stanford scientists are raising new concerns about contaminated drinking water. Please join us to discuss what we know about the environmental effects of fracking.

Guests

Mark Boling

president, V+ Development Solutions, a division of Southwestern Energy Company

Amy Mall

policy analyst, Natural Resources Defense Council

Abrahm Lustgarten

reporter at ProPublica.

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