Judging The Credibility Of News In The Digital Age

 - Photo Illustration by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Photo Illustration by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Judging The Credibility Of News In The Digital Age

Americans have access to more news than ever before. But polls suggest trust in our sources of information is at a record low. Diane and her guests discuss how to judge the credibility of news in the digital age.

Americans are getting their news from more places than ever before. Besides traditional sources, we are turning to social media, email and even late-night TV to find out what’s happening in the world. And we are increasingly able to target news based on our interests and ideology. Some journalists worry the sheer volume of all that information is affecting our news literacy. They say we need to think critically about our daily media diet and ask more questions about who is producing and sourcing the news we consume and why. Diane and her guests discuss how to sort fact from fiction in the digital age.

Guests

Alan Miller

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist; founder, president, and CEO of The News Literacy Project.

Amanda Ripley

investigative journalist and author of "The Smartest Kids in the World."

Andy Carvin

former social media desk editor, NPR; recently joined journalism start-up First Look Media.

Tom Rosenstiel

executive director, American Press Institute; co-author of “Blur: How to Know What to Believe in the Age of Information Overload.”

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