Police, Race And The Use Of Deadly Force

A police officer watches over demonstrators protesting the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown on August 13, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri.  - Scott Olson/Getty Images

A police officer watches over demonstrators protesting the shooting death of teenager Michael Brown on August 13, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Police, Race And The Use Of Deadly Force

Michael Brown’s death sparks a national conversation about what happens when police don’t reflect the communities they serve. As the Justice Department investigates police tactics across the country, we discuss new questions about police, race and the use of deadly force.

More than a week after the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown, the city of Ferguson, Missouri is still in turmoil. Protests became increasingly violent this weekend, prompting the governor to impose a midnight curfew and deploy the Missouri National Guard to the city. Brown’s death has reignited the anger of many who say minorities today are still disproportionately targeted by law enforcement. In the wake of several other recent deaths at the hands of police, there are also renewed calls for a review of when lethal force against civilians is justified. We discuss police tactics, minorities and the use of deadly force.

Guests

Anthony Cook

professor of law, Georgetown University Law Center. He teaches courses in constitutional law, civil rights and African-American critical thought.

Devlin Barrett

reporter, security and law enforcement, The Wall Street Journal.

Andrew Ferguson

associate professor of law, University of the District of Columbia School of Law. He teaches and writes in the areas of criminal law, criminal procedure, and evidence.

Walter Olson

senior fellow, the Cato Institute Center for Constitutional Studies.

Rich Roberts

public information officer, the International Union of Police Associations. He served in law enforcement for many years before taking on his current role.

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