New Efforts To Address The Child Migrant Crisis

In this June 19, 2014 photo, a 14-year-old Guatemalan girl traveling alone waits for a northbound freight train along with other Central American migrants, in Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico. The United States has seen a dramatic increase in the number of Central American migrants crossing into its territory, particularly children traveling without any adult guardian. More than 52,000 unaccompanied children have been apprehended since October.   - AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

In this June 19, 2014 photo, a 14-year-old Guatemalan girl traveling alone waits for a northbound freight train along with other Central American migrants, in Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico. The United States has seen a dramatic increase in the number of Central American migrants crossing into its territory, particularly children traveling without any adult guardian. More than 52,000 unaccompanied children have been apprehended since October.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

New Efforts To Address The Child Migrant Crisis

An update on efforts to address the child migrant crisis, from competing plans from the Senate Democrats and House Republicans to the latest proposals from the White House.

In a meeting last week President Barack Obama told the presidents of Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala that many of the children from these countries who have turned themselves into U.S. border agents will need to be sent home. Since last October, approximately 57,000 children from Central America have come to the U.S. With Congress deadlocked on ways to address the current child migration crisis and the larger issue of what to do about the 11 million people in this country without legal authorization, Obama has vowed to fix much of our immigration system on his own. Please join us to discuss next steps for immigration reform.

Guests

Laura Meckler

staff writer, The Wall Street Journal.

Carl Meacham

Americas program director at Center for Strategic & International Studies.

Mark Hugo Lopez

director, Hispanic trends, Pew Research

Marc Rosenblum

deputy director, U.S. immigration policy program,
Migration Policy Institute

Please familiarize yourself with our Code of Conduct and Terms of Use before posting your comments.

Our address has changed!

The Diane Rehm Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.