The Sharing Economy

Washington, D.C. taxi drivers park their cars and honk the horn in protest on Pennsylvania Avenue, bringing street traffic to a stop as they demand an end to ride sharing services such as Uber X and Lyft on June 25, 2014, in Washington, D.C.   -  PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

Washington, D.C. taxi drivers park their cars and honk the horn in protest on Pennsylvania Avenue, bringing street traffic to a stop as they demand an end to ride sharing services such as Uber X and Lyft on June 25, 2014, in Washington, D.C.

PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

The Sharing Economy

In the wake of massive protests by taxi drivers over ridesharing services like Uber, a conversation about the Sharing Economy and the future of services like Lyft and Airbnb.

More and more, consumers are turning to Uber to hail rides with their smartphones, or renting spare rooms from strangers online through Airbnb. These companies typify the sharing economy where everyone can be a micro-entrepreneur and provide valued services without a professional middleman. But as these peer-to-peer businesses explode in popularity, cities are dealing with major questions over how to regulate them. Following a wave of recent protests by taxi drivers across the U.S. and Europe, the debate over these services is heating up. Diane and her guests have a conversation about regulating the sharing economy, and what it means for businesses and consumers.

Guests

Dean Baker

co-director, Center for Economic and Policy Research and blogger, Beat the Press; author of "The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive."

Emily Badger

staff writer at The Washington Post covering urban policy.

Arun Sundararajan

Professor of information, operations and management sciences, NYU Stern School of Business

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