Robert Caro: LBJ and the Civil Rights Act of 1964

US President Lyndon Johnson (l) shakes hands with the US clergyman and civil rights leader Martin Luther KIng (c) on July 3, 1964 in Washington DC, after handing him a pen during the ceremonies for the signing of the civil rights bill at the White House.   - AFP/Getty Images

US President Lyndon Johnson (l) shakes hands with the US clergyman and civil rights leader Martin Luther KIng (c) on July 3, 1964 in Washington DC, after handing him a pen during the ceremonies for the signing of the civil rights bill at the White House.

AFP/Getty Images

Robert Caro: LBJ and the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law. We talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Robert Caro on LBJ and his role in the struggle for civil rights.

Fifty years ago this week, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law, ending legal segregation in public places. He was an unlikely civil rights champion: As a powerful senator from the state of Texas, he regularly sought to block civil rights legislative efforts, but in his first few months as president he made civil rights a top priority. In Robert Caro's fourth volume on LBJ, "Passage to Power" published in 2012, Caro details Johnson's remarkable role in struggle for the civil rights. Please join our conversation with two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biographer Robert Caro on President Lyndon Johnson, the 1964 Civil Rights Act and political lessons for today.

Guests

Robert Caro

Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer and historian.
most recent book: "Passage to Power", 2012

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