The Boom in High-Tech Health Apps and Wireless Devices

From left, four recent wearable health trackres: Fitbit Force, Jawbone Up, Fitbug Orb and the Nike FuelBand SE. The latest crop of fitness gadgets will record much more than how many steps you took on any given day. From sleep patterns to calorie intake, mood and progress toward exercise goals, few aspects of life are left un-tracked for those in search for a more quantified self.  - AP Photo/Richard Drew

From left, four recent wearable health trackres: Fitbit Force, Jawbone Up, Fitbug Orb and the Nike FuelBand SE. The latest crop of fitness gadgets will record much more than how many steps you took on any given day. From sleep patterns to calorie intake, mood and progress toward exercise goals, few aspects of life are left un-tracked for those in search for a more quantified self.

AP Photo/Richard Drew

The Boom in High-Tech Health Apps and Wireless Devices

More than 100,000 health-related apps are now on the market. Many connect to wireless devices that are worn, or even ingested. We explore the benefits and risks of wireless medical technology.

More than 100,000 health and medical apps are now on the market. Many of these connect to high-tech wireless devices that are worn, or even ingested, by consumers and patients. Apple, for example, announced this month the creation of an app that will allow users to track their vital signs and interact with their doctors’ offices. Another app wirelessly connects to a microchip that is swallowed with pills so patients and their doctors can monitor if medicine is taken correctly. Susan Page and a panel of guests discuss the benefits and risks of new wireless health technology.

Guests

Dr. James Giordano

scholar-in-residence and chief, Neuroethics Studies Program at the Pellegrino Center for Clinical Bioethics at Georgetown University Medical Center

Dr. Steven Steinhubl

director of Digital Medicine at Scripps Health, affiliated with the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, California

Arthur Allen

editor of eHealth at Politico

Dr. George Savage

Chief Medical Officer, Proteus Digital Health

Steven Posnack

director, Office of Standards and Technology, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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