James Joyce And The Centennial Of "Dubliners"

A photograph of Irish writer James Joyce by Berenice Abbott is displayed at the Park Avenue Armory. - Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A photograph of Irish writer James Joyce by Berenice Abbott is displayed at the Park Avenue Armory.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

James Joyce And The Centennial Of "Dubliners"

James Joyce's classic short story collection "Dubliners" turns 100 this month. His portrait of "dear dirty Dublin" shocked the conventional literary world of 1914. Guest host Tom Gjelten and his guests explore the legacy of the Irish novelist and poet many call one of the 20th century's greatest writers.

James Joyce is widely acknowledged as a literary giant. Many consider his novels—especially “Ulysses“—to be among the most influential of the 20th century. Joyce fans worldwide still celebrate “Bloomsday,” the date that “Ulysses” protagonist Leopold Bloom made his famous journey around Dublin in the vein of Homer’s “Odyssey.” Joyce’s collection of short stories, “Dubliners," which includes his celebrated “The Dead," turns 100 years old this month. But despite his great talent, the author struggled to get his early work published. He faced disgrace in his native Ireland and chose to live and write abroad in self exile. Guest host Tom Gjelten and his guests discuss the legacy of James Joyce and “Dubliners.”

Guests

Coilin Owens

Joyce scholar and professor emeritus of English, George Mason University. His latest book is titled "Before Daybreak: 'After the Race' and the Origins of Joyce's Art."

Dan Moshenberg

Joyce scholar and director of women's studies at The George Washington University.

Maureen Corrigan

critic in residence and lecturer in the English department at Georgetown University. Her latest book is titled, "So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures."

Colum McCann

author of the novels "Transatlantic" and "Let The Great World Spin."

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