Friday News Roundup - Domestic

In this Aug. 3, 2011 file photo, Texas State Park police officer Thomas Bigham walks across the cracked lake bed of O.C. Fisher Lake in San Angelo, Texas. Global warming is rapidly turning America the beautiful into America the stormy, sneezy and dangerous, according to a new report.  - AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez

In this Aug. 3, 2011 file photo, Texas State Park police officer Thomas Bigham walks across the cracked lake bed of O.C. Fisher Lake in San Angelo, Texas. Global warming is rapidly turning America the beautiful into America the stormy, sneezy and dangerous, according to a new report.

AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Releasing a report on climate change, President Barack Obama says "this is not some distant problem of the future." The House forms a panel to investigate the 2012 attacks in Benghazi. And Monica Lewinsky speaks out in a story in Vanity Fair. A panel of journalists joins guest host Steve Roberts to discuss the week in news.

The White House releases a report on climate change that says “this is not some distant problem of the future." Sylvia Mathews Burwell, the nominee to head the Department of Health and Human Services, faces her first day of confirmation hearings. The House votes along partisan lines to form a panel to investigate the 2012 attacks in Benghazi, Libya. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen tells a Senate committee that she is optimistic about economic growth but still concerned about unemployment. And Monica Lewinsky speaks out in a story in Vanity Fair. A panel of journalists joins guest host Steve Roberts to discuss the week in news.

Guests

Juliet Eilperin

White House correspondent, The Washington Post.

Damian Paletta

economic policy reporter, The Wall Street Journal.

Jonathan Weisman

congressional reporter, The New York Times.

Watch A Featured Clip

Tea Party candidates aren't poised to win many state primaries in 2014, if any at all--a sign that could indicate the party is losing steam.

Other than one close district in Mississippi, most of the 2014 races favor Republican Party candidates, not those backed by the Tea Party, said Jonathan Weisman,a congressional reporter for The New York Times.

"This is the year when the Tea Party goes on the run," Weisman said Friday on The Diane Rehm show.

While its candidates may not make it to November's elections, the Tea Party still has considerable influence on Capitol Hill, said Juliet Eilperin, the White House correspondent for The Washington Post.

That influence will likely factor heavily into debates around immigration reform, as House Speaker John Boehner (R) seeks to pass new legislation.

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