The Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Affirmative Action Ban

Tabrian Joe, a Sophomore at Western Michigan University, leads a protest in support of affirmative action, outside the Supreme Court during the hearing of 'Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action' on October 15, 2013 in Washington, DC. The case revolves around affirmative action and whether or not states have the right to ban schools from using race as a consideration in school admissions.  The Supreme Court upheld Michigan's ban on affirmative action on April 22, 2014. - Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Tabrian Joe, a Sophomore at Western Michigan University, leads a protest in support of affirmative action, outside the Supreme Court during the hearing of 'Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action' on October 15, 2013 in Washington, DC. The case revolves around affirmative action and whether or not states have the right to ban schools from using race as a consideration in school admissions. The Supreme Court upheld Michigan's ban on affirmative action on April 22, 2014.

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Affirmative Action Ban

The Supreme Court upholds a Michigan voter initiative that bans racial preferences in the state’s public universities: The future of race-based admissions.

A decade ago, the Supreme Court ruled that colleges and universities could take race into account as one of several variables in the admissions process. But in 2006, the state of Michigan passed a constitutional amendment banning affirmative action at its public universities. And yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld the Michigan law. Supporters of the decision say it affirms the right of voters to decide what’s best for admissions policies at their state colleges. But opponents argue it leads to a lack of diversity in higher education. We discuss the Supreme Court’s decision and the future of affirmative action at public colleges and universities

Guests

Stuart Taylor

author and journalist, senior fellow, The Brookings Institution; contributing editor, National Journal; co-author of "Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It's Intended to Help, and Why Universities Won't Admit It"

Jeffrey Rosen

president and CEO, The National Constitution Center; professor, George Washington University Law School; legal affairs editor, The New Republic; author, "The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America" and co-editor, "Constitution 3.0."

Sherrilyn Ifill

president and director-counsel, NAACP Legal Defense Fund

Martha Pollack

provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, University of Michigan

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