Update On Diagnosing And Treating Lyme Disease

A close-up of an adult female deer tick, dog tick and a Lone Star tick are shown on the palm of hand. Ticks cause an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and flu-like symptoms called Lyme Disease.  - (Photo By Getty Images)

A close-up of an adult female deer tick, dog tick and a Lone Star tick are shown on the palm of hand. Ticks cause an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and flu-like symptoms called Lyme Disease.

(Photo By Getty Images)

Update On Diagnosing And Treating Lyme Disease

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year. An update on the challenges of diagnosing and treating Lyme disease.

Each year an estimated 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with Lyme disease, and many say this number is likely to be low because not all cases are reported. Those cases that are reported are concentrated in the Mid-Atlantic states into New England and in the Upper Midwest. The disease is associated with a number of debilitating symptoms including fever, joint pain and headaches. Antibiotics can usually be effective an treatment but not always. Guest host Frank Sesno and panelists discuss the challenges of diagnosing and treating Lyme disease.

Guests

Dr. Paul Mead

chief of epidemiology and surveillance, Lyme disease program at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Dr. John Aucott

assistant professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and clinical researcher, founder and president, Lyme Disease Research Foundation.

Monica Embers

PhD, Tulane National Primate Research Center.

Pamela Weintraub

senior editor, Discover Magazine and author of "Cure Unknown."

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