The Safety Of Prescription Drugs Made Outside The U.S.

Popular prescription medicines on display at the Generic Drug Store at the Victoria Hospital in Bangalore, India, on June 28, 2012. Estimates by Dolat Capital show that the U.S. generic market, currently estimated at $350 billion, which is 75 percent of the pharmaceutical industry volume, is expected to grow by around 12-13 percent over 2011-15.  - (Manjunath Kiran/AFP/GettyImages)

Popular prescription medicines on display at the Generic Drug Store at the Victoria Hospital in Bangalore, India, on June 28, 2012. Estimates by Dolat Capital show that the U.S. generic market, currently estimated at $350 billion, which is 75 percent of the pharmaceutical industry volume, is expected to grow by around 12-13 percent over 2011-15.

(Manjunath Kiran/AFP/GettyImages)

The Safety Of Prescription Drugs Made Outside The U.S.

Forty percent of prescription drugs consumed in the U.S. come from India. Now, the FDA is stepping up scrutiny of pharmaceutical firms there after concerns over quality. Diane and her guests discuss where our medicine is made and challenges of ensuring safety.

The head of the Food and Drug Administration just wrapped up a trip to India. This unusual visit abroad was to address growing concerns at the regulatory agency about the safety of prescription drugs made in India. In the last few months, the FDA has banned the importation of several popular drugs made there, like Accutane and Cipro. The U.S. has come to rely on medicine made overseas. Today, 80 percent of prescription drugs consumed in the U.S. originate in India and China. This has lowered costs, but raised new questions on safety. Diane and her guests discuss prescription drugs made outside the U.S.

Guests

Dr. Jesse Goodman

director of the Center on Medical Product Access, Safety and Stewardship and professor of medicine at the Georgetown University Medical Center; attending physician, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital and Washington DC VA Medical Center. He was formerly chief scientist for the Food and Drug Administration.

Heather Bresch

CEO, Mylan.

Dr. Margaret Hamburg

commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration.

Gardiner Harris

South Asia correspondent for The New York Times. He is the author of the mystery novel "Hazard."

Allan Coukell

director of drugs and medical devices, The Pew Charitable Trusts.

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