The Latest Trends In Wearable Technology

A man tests a pair of Google glasses equiped with Italian Sign Language capabilities and created to help deaf people during their visit of the Egyptian Museum in Turin, on November 11, 2013. The Museum of Egyptian Antiquity in Turin is dedicated solely to Egyptian art and culture, and it is the first museum of its kind to use the interactive glasses to assist deaf people during their visit.  - (GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)

A man tests a pair of Google glasses equiped with Italian Sign Language capabilities and created to help deaf people during their visit of the Egyptian Museum in Turin, on November 11, 2013. The Museum of Egyptian Antiquity in Turin is dedicated solely to Egyptian art and culture, and it is the first museum of its kind to use the interactive glasses to assist deaf people during their visit.

(GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)

The Latest Trends In Wearable Technology

Consumers learned this week that Google Glass will be available for prescription lenses. A look at the world of wearable technology, from privacy concerns to the challenge of making them fashionable.

This week, consumers who are both fashion conscious and technologically savvy -- and wear glasses -- got welcome news: Google Glass will now be available for prescription lenses. These glasses, which allow people to shoot video and check email, are on the leading edge of so called “wearable technology." The new trend includes everything from smart watches to bracelets that monitor fitness. What could be done on our smart phones can be accomplished from smaller and smaller gadgets. But whether consumers are convinced to buy might have less to do with functionality and more to do with personal style. Diane and her panel of guests discuss new trends in wearable technology.

Guests

Cecilia Kang

technology reporter, The Washington Post.

Bill Wasik

senior editor, WIRED. His cover article for the January issue is called "Heads Up: Why Wearable Tech Will Be As Big As The Smartphone."

Marlene Morris Towns

teaching professor of marketing, Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business. She is also the academic director at the Georgetown Institute for Consumer Research.

Thad Starner

technical lead/manager, Google's Project Glass. He is director of the Contextual Computing Group at Georgia Tech.

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