Designing The Modern Office Space

An employee for Google works at the internet company's new office space inside the historic Chelsea Market June 23, 2008 in New York City. The new space, which is across the street from the older Google office, will house around 300 employees bringing the total number of Google employees in New York City to around 1,500.  - (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

An employee for Google works at the internet company's new office space inside the historic Chelsea Market June 23, 2008 in New York City. The new space, which is across the street from the older Google office, will house around 300 employees bringing the total number of Google employees in New York City to around 1,500.

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Designing The Modern Office Space

For years, the trend in workplace design has been to knock down walls and tear down doors. But some say it’s gone too far. How office design affects workers, business and the bottom line.

Office design has evolved alongside the changing nature of our work. As businesses shifted toward more collaboration, the physical barriers came tumbling down. As management structures morphed, some got rid of the corner office. Today, 70 percent of office spaces in the U.S. have an open floor plan. Meant to foster communication and stoke innovation, critics say we may have gone too far and that perhaps we've sacrificed focus for the free-flow of ideas. Diane and her guests discuss how workplace design affect workers, businesses and the bottom line.

Guests

Janet Pogue

principal, Gensler.

Gloria Mark

informatics professor, University of California, Irvine.

Christine Porath

associate professor of business administration, Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business.

Allison Arieff

editor of The Urbanist, the magazine of SPUR (San Francisco Planning and Urban Research).

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