Four Years After Citizens United: The State Of Money In Politics

Four Years After Citizens United: The State Of Money In Politics

In January 2010, the Supreme Court ruled corporations could spend unlimited amounts of money to support or oppose candidates. Four years later: money in politics and the state of campaign finance reform.

In January 2010, the Supreme Court handed down their landmark Citizens United ruling, dramatically altering campaign finance in America. The decision allowed corporations and labor unions to spend unlimited money directly on politics and it created an explosion in so-called 501(c)(4)s, nonprofits named for where they fall in the tax code. As these organizations have become some of the biggest spenders in politics today, new questions are arising in D.C. and around the country about how -- and whether -- money in politics should be reined in. Four years after Citizens United: how we pay for politics and the state of campaign finance reform.

Guests

Lawrence Lessig

professor, Harvard Law School and director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. He is leading "The New Hampshire Rebellion" in support of campaign finance reform.

Matea Gold

reporter covering money and politics, The Washington Post.

Bradley Smith

chairman and founder, Center for Competitive Politics. He is a professor at the West Virginia University College of Law.

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