New State Laws On Juvenile Justice

New State Laws On Juvenile Justice

In a reversal of the tough-on-crime legislation of the late 1980s and 1990s, 23 states have enacted laws that aim to keep juveniles out of adult prisons and court systems. A panel discusses a range of factors, including suicides by youths in adult jails as well as the cost of adult prisons, that have led to new legislation across the country.

Over the last decade, 23 states have enacted laws that aim to keep juveniles out of adult prisons and court systems. The shift is a reversal of the tough-on-crime legislation of the 1980s and 1990s. The new laws stem from concerns about teenage suicides in adult jails and new research showing that young people held in adult courts are more likely to be repeat offenders than juveniles not held in adult jails. But some state attorneys are against the change. They say the legislation adds unnecessary delays to prosecution and are an insult to victims. Join Diane and a panel of guests for a discussion on these new laws that aim to keep youths out of adult prisons and courts.

Guests

John Schwartz

national correspondent, The New York Times.

Liz Ryan

president, Campaign for Youth Justice.

Dan May

district attorney, Colorado Springs, Colo.

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