A Preview Of The U.S. Supreme Court's Fall Term

A Preview Of The U.S. Supreme Court's Fall Term

The U.S. Supreme Court is back in session, with justices planning to hear cases on campaign finance, affirmative action and the constitutionality of legislative prayer. A preview of the Court's fall term.

The federal government remains partially shut down, but the U.S. Supreme Court's nine justices are back at work. Today is the first day of their new term. They have agreed to hear more than 50 cases, some of which address issues that have placed social liberals and conservatives in sharply opposing camps, such as on abortion protests and the separation of church and state. Another is the first major campaign finance case since Citizens United in 2010. Once again the outcome of a number of cases could depend on Justice Kennedy. Last year his vote tipped more five-to-four decisions than any other justice. Diane and her guests talk about some of the key issues before the nation's highest court this fall.

Guests

David Cole

law professor, Georgetown University Law Center and author, "The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable." His previous books include "Less Safe, Less Free" and "Terrorism and the Constitution."

Dahlia Lithwick

reporter, Slate.com.

Jeffrey Rosen

president and CEO, The National Constitution Center; professor, George Washington University Law School; legal affairs editor, The New Republic; author, "The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America" and co-editor, "Constitution 3.0."

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