Judith Flanders: "The Invention Of Murder"

Magazine illustration of the discovery of one of Jack the Ripper's victims. Illustration: Museum in Docklands -

Magazine illustration of the discovery of one of Jack the Ripper's victims. Illustration: Museum in Docklands

Judith Flanders: "The Invention Of Murder"

Author Judith Flanders joins guest host Frank Sesno to talk about the evolution of the real -- and fictional -- crime story.

Murder was incredibly rare in Victorian England. In 1810, only 15 people were convicted of the crime in England and Wales, out of a population of 10 million. But even though homicide was infrequent, the British became obsessed with these often gory crimes. Throughout the 19th century, Judith Flanders, author of "The Invention Of Murder," says true murder stories seeped into all forms of popular entertainment, from the absurd like wax museums and “murder tourism" to the theater, novels and detective stories we love today. Author Judith Flanders joins guest host Frank Sesno to talk about the evolution of the real -- and fictional -- crime story.

Guests

Judith Flanders

author of "The Invention of Murder: How Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime."

Read An Excerpt

From "Invention of Murder" by Judith Flanders. Copyright © 2013 by the author and reprinted by permission of St. Martin’s Press, LLC

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