The Changing Suburbs

A new housing development in San Jose, Calif. 

 - (Wikimedia)

A new housing development in San Jose, Calif.

(Wikimedia)

The Changing Suburbs

For decades, the suburbs were seen as ideal communities for middle and upper class families looking for good schools and safe communities. But now, suburbia is home to the largest and fastest growing poor population in the country.

Fifty years ago, the suburbs were seen as an ideal community for families looking for good schools and safe neighborhoods. But today’s suburbia is a very different place. The suburbs are now home to the largest and fastest-growing poor population in the country. The spread of suburban poverty has many causes, including the subprime mortgage crisis and decline in manufacturing jobs. The suburbs have also become more ethnically and racially diverse and are voting more for Democrats. Meanwhile, many wealthy and middle class people are choosing to move back to the cities.

Guests

Dante Chinni

columnist for the Wall Street Journal and director of the "American Communities Project" at the School of Public Affairs at American University.

Leigh Gallagher

assistant managing editor of Fortune magazine and author of "The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving."

Elizabeth Kneebone

fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution.

Read An Excerpt

Excerpted from "The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream Is Moving" by Leigh Gallagher. Copyright © 2013 Leigh Gallagher. Reprinted with permission of Portfolio Hardcover. All rights reserved.

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