Tens of thousands of visitors are expected to flood the 6,000-acre Gettysburg National Military Park and surrounding town this week to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. The events of July 1-3, 1863, produced more than 50,000 casualties, with an estimated 7,500 soldiers killed. Many historians consider Gettysburg a major turning point of the Civil War after Northern forces turned away a Confederate advance. And in the decades following the conflict, the battleground became a symbol of reconciliation. Diane and her guests discuss the significance of the Battle of Gettysburg and how it’s remembered.

Guests

  • Ervin Jordan associate professor of history and research archivist, University of Virginia member, Gettysburg Foundation Board of Directors
  • Scott Hartwig supervisory historian at Gettysburg National Military Park.
  • Drew Gilpin Faust president of Harvard University, historian and author of "This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War."
  • Eleanor Harvey senior curator at Smithsonian American Art Museum.
  • Adam Goodheart director of Washington College’s C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and author of "1861: The Civil War Awakening."

Photos: Battle Of Gettysburg

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