Hunger Strike At Guantanamo Prison

Hunger Strike At Guantanamo Prison

More than half the prisoners at Guantanamo are on a hunger strike. Most of the inmates are still being held without charges. The unclear future of Guantanamo.

More than half the detainees at the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo are on a hunger strike. Their lawyers as well as military officials say the protest reflects the level of despair felt by the prisoners there. Set up under President George W. Bush to hold terror suspects after 9/11, the prison today incarcerates 166 men. Most of them have never been charged with a crime. Detainee advocates want President Barack Obama to make good on his promise to close the Guantanamo facility. But others argue the detainees pose a national security threat -- even those who have been cleared for transfer to their home countries. A discussion of the future of Guantanamo's detainees.

Guests

Charles Savage

Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington correspondent for The New York Times and author of the book "Takeover: The Return of the Imperial Presidency."

Yochi Dreazen

contributing editor for The Atlantic and writer-in-residence at the Center for a New American Security.

Andrea Prasow

senior counterterrorism counsel and advocate at Human Rights Watch.

Clifford May

president of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

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