Readers' Review: "The Lonely Girl" By Edna O'Brien

Pedestrians crossing from the top of Talbot Street toward Henry Street in Dublin, Ireland, in 1969.
 - (National Library of Ireland)

Pedestrians crossing from the top of Talbot Street toward Henry Street in Dublin, Ireland, in 1969.

(National Library of Ireland)

Readers' Review: "The Lonely Girl" By Edna O'Brien

For this month's Readers’ Review: Edna O’Brien’s “Country Girls” trilogy was banned –- and burned -- when it was first published in the 1960s. The series’ second novel traces the sexual awakening of two Irish girls of that era.

When the first novel of Edna O’Brien’s “Country Girl” trilogy was published in 1960, it was banned –- and burned –- in her native Ireland. The author’s own mother went through the book, blackening all the offending words. Today it’s hard to imagine that a series about two Irish girls coming of age could stir up so much moral outrage. The story of Kate and Baba traced their lives from youthful friendship through sexual awakening to marriage. In the trilogy’s second book, the pair have moved from the countryside of their childhood to what they hope is a new life in Dublin. But their principles and friendship are tested when Kate falls in love with a married man. Join Diane and her guests for a Readers’ Review of Edna O’Brien’s “The Lonely Girl.”

Guests

Maureen Corrigan

critic in residence and lecturer in the English department at Georgetown University.

Dan Moshenberg

director of women's studies at The George Washington University.

Michelle Woods

assistant professor in the English department at State University of New York at New Paltz.

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Read An Excerpt

Excerpt from "The Lonely Girl" by Edna O'Brien. Copyright 2002 by Edna O'Brien. Reprinted here by permission of Plume. All rights reserved.

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