Many writers have warned about the perils of climate change. But few novelists have succeeded in turning scientific data into gripping fiction. The best-selling author of “The Lacuna” and “The Poisonwood Bible” hopes to change that. Barbara Kingsolver’s latest book tells the story of Dellarobia Turnbow, a young mother trapped in rural poverty, who discovers millions of butterflies glowing like a “lake of fire” in a pasture. That vision — which stops her from an adulterous tryst – and its aftermath becomes a wake-up call about climate change for an Appalachian community. It also marks the beginning of a new life for her. Join Diane for her interview with author Barbara Kingsolver.

Guests

  • Barbara Kingsolver author of seven works of fiction, including "The Poisonwood Bible," "Animal Dreams," "The Bean Trees" and a recent memoir, "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle."

Read An Excerpt

From FLIGHT BEHAVIOR by Barbara Kingsolver Copyright © 2012 by Barbara Kingsolver. Reprinted courtesy of Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

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