Environmental Outlook: Elephants And The Ivory Trade

Environmental Outlook: Elephants And The Ivory Trade

Tens of thousands of African elephants are being slaughtered every year to meet demand for ivory in China, the Philippines and Thailand. Inside the underground ivory trade and the future of Africa's elephants.

The 1989 global ban on ivory trade was supposed to end the widespread slaughter of elephants in Africa -- it hasn’t. Exact numbers are hard to come by, but by almost every estimate, poachers are now killing tens of thousands of elephants a year, more than at any time in the last two decades. Increasingly, the killers are armed militants seeking quick cash, and demand for smuggled ivory is strong. In Southeast Asia it remains a prized material for religious carvings, and in China it’s coveted by the newly enriched middle class. Please join us to discuss the illegal ivory trade and the future of Africa’s elephants.

Guests

Bryan Christy

investigative reporter and author of the October 2012 National Geographic article, "Ivory Worship."

Joyce Poole

co-founder of ElephantVoices.

Richard Ruggiero

chief of the Near East, South Asia and Africa branch in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service division of international conservation.

Robert Hormats

Under Secretary of State for economic, energy and agricultural affairs.

Related Video

National Geographic Reporter Bryan Christy discovers how religion plays a role in the problem of ivory trafficking. From "Blood Ivory," the October 2012 cover story of National Geographic magazine.

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