Growing up in Springdale, Penn., Rachel Carson was an avid reader who dreamed of becoming a writer. But a college biology teacher turned Carson’s interest to the sciences. Her work at the Bureau of Fisheries led to the 1951 bestseller, “The Sea Around Us,” which was the second of three books on ocean life. But then Carson learned a Long Island, N.Y., community was suing the federal government for spraying the insecticide DDT. Inspired by that case, Carson wrote the 1962 classic, “Silent Spring,” which launched the modern environmental movement. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: A new biography of the life and legacy of Rachel Carson.

Guests

  • William Souder author of the Pulitzer Prize finalist biography of John Audubon, "Under a Wild Sky."

Read An Excerpt

“On a Farther Shore” by William Souder (2012). Copyright © The Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc.

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