Talking about death and dying is never easy. Many of us cling to the childhood belief that parents are invincible. But avoiding an end-of life conversation with a loved one could have tragic consequences. It might mean a surrogate who has different values from your mother could end up making decisions for her. Or that your uncle won’t qualify for Medicaid because he didn’t understand the process. Armed with basic facts and good listening skills, it’s possible to create a strategy that gives a loved one comfort and provides caregivers with peace of mind. Diane and her guests explore how to begin discussions about end-of life care.

Guests

  • Charles Sabatino director of the Commission on Law and Aging, American Bar Association.
  • Sue Belanger clinical ethicist and adjunct assistant professor at Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies, and director of education, training and research at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C.
  • Janis Abrahms Spring clinical psychologist and author of "Life with Pop: Lessons on Caring for an Aging Parent" and "After the Affair."

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