In the years following World War II, traditional religious institutions flourished: more than half of all Americans attended weekly church services, and 70 percent were formally affiliated. Religion dominated public discourse and helped propel the civil rights movement. But the culture wars of the 1960s triggered a downward spiral for mainstream Christianity that has continued to the present day. In a new book, New York Times columnist Ross Douthat argues that this loss of a traditional, Christian center is at the heart of America’s current crisis. He says we’ve become a nation of heretics and explains what that means for our future.

Guests

  • Ross Douthat Op-Ed columnist, The New York Times.

Related Links

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Friday News Roundup – International

Friday, Apr 24 2015The White House says two al-Qaida hostages were killed in a U.S. counter-terrorism operation. E.U. leaders meet to address the migrant crisis. And Saudi Arabia resumes airstrikes in Yemen. A panel of journalists joins Diane to round up the week's top news.

Friday News Roundup – Domestic

Friday, Apr 24 2015The Senate confirms Loretta Lynch to lead the Justice Department. David Petraeus is sentenced for leaking military secrets. And the F.B.I. arrests Islamic State supporters in Minnesota. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

Jon Krakauer: “Missoula”

Thursday, Apr 23 2015A conversation with best-selling writer Jon Krakauer on his latest book of non-fiction. The author of “Into the Wild” and “Into Thin Air” chronicles the lives of several women allegedly raped on campus at the University of Montana.