When teenager Frank Mccourt sailed from Ireland to America in 1949, he had nothing. With just a primary school education, he managed to attend college and eventually became a high school English teacher. For 30 years, Mccourt entertained his students with tales of his childhood in Limerick. On his last day of teaching, one student told him he should write a memoir. “Angela’s Ashes,” published in 1996, vaulted Frank Mccourt from an unknown first-time writer in his sixties to a world-renowned author. It’s the story of a childhood shaped not just by poverty, but also a resilient spirit. Join Diane and her guests for our March Reader’s Review of “Angela’s Ashes.”

Guests

  • Caitriona Palmer Washington Correspondent, The Irish Independent
  • Peter Quinn novelist and political historian
  • Coilin Owens Professor Emeritus of English, George Mason University
  • Billy Collins U.S. Poet Laureate 2001 to 2003. He is a Distinguished Professor of English at City University of New York, where he has taught for the past 30 years.

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