Cash is on the way out. Americans carry it less and less often due in part to new technology and a growing desire for convenience. We now use cards, computers, and even mobile phones to pay for everything from our morning coffee to the parking meter. Critics of cash say it’s covered in germs and traces of drugs, it penalizes the poor, and it keeps criminals in business. But while the value of cash is coming under fire, many are reluctant to give it up. Some workers still rely on physical money for their income. And using cash rather than virtual money has been proven to keep us out of debt. Diane and her guest discuss the diminishing use of cash and how it’s changing the way we do business.

Guests

  • David Wolman contributing editor, Wired magazine

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