The market for gluten-free food is booming. Products made without wheat were once just targeted to those with celiac disease – an auto-immune disorder of the small intestine. Most researchers believe celiac disease affects less than one percent of all Americans, yet as many as 25 percent of us seek out gluten-free foods. Many consumers believe eliminating wheat from their diet may improve their digestive health, help them lose weight, or relieve joint pain. Until now, it’s been difficult to diagnosis gluten-related disorders that aren’t celiac disease. That may be about to change. Diane and her guests discuss why gluten sensitivity is on the rise, how it differs from celiac disease, and what’s behind the latest food craze.

Guests

  • Katherine Tallmadge dietician, nutritionist and past spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
  • Melissa Abbot director, Culinary Insights, The Hartman Group
  • Dr. Aline Charabaty director of the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases at Georgetown University Hospital
  • Dr. Alessio Fasano professor of pediatrics, medicine and physiology and director of the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research (CFCR) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine

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