Last week in his State of the Union address President Obama called for tax reform to ensure fair play. He proposed what he called a Buffett Rule: a minimum federal income tax of 30% for people making over $1 million. Republicans say he’s pushing class warfare and stifling economic growth in a period of weak growth. GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney is facing criticism for both how he made his enormous fortune and for his seemingly low tax rate, but, as many analysts point out, most households pay at an even lower rate. Please join us to discuss the tax rates and he economy.

Guests

  • Jared Bernstein senior fellow, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; former chief economist and economic policy adviser for Vice President Biden.
  • David Leonhardt Washington bureau chief, The New York Times.
  • Alice Rivlin senior fellow, Brookings Institution, vice chair, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System (1996-99); director, White House Office of Management and Budget (1994-96); and founding director, Congressional Budget Office (1975-83).
  • Stephen Moore member of the Wall Street Journal's editorial board.

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Analysis Of The New Hampshire Primary

Wednesday, Feb 10 2016New Hampshire holds the nation's first primary election. The winners, the losers and what the results could mean for the presidential candidates vying for the Democratic and Republican nominations.

Improving Doctor-Patient Communication In A Digital World

Tuesday, Feb 09 2016Poor communication between doctors and patients is widely seen as a problem in American healthcare. Now more and more healthcare providers are giving patients new ways of accessing doctors to ask questions or express concerns. In the age of email, texting, video chatting and social media, a look at the promise and limitations of digital communication to improve patient experiences and outcomes.

What’s Behind Trends In U.S. Violent Crime Rates

Tuesday, Feb 09 2016Violent crime rates in the U.S. have dropped dramatically over the last twenty years, but FBI data suggest there was a slight uptick in the first half of last year. What led to the remarkable long-term decline in violent crime in the last two decades in U.S. and what are the prospects the trajectory can continue?