A new report predicts one in 10 adults worldwide could have diabetes by 2030. More than 350 million people already have the disease. For years, global resources have been aimed at fighting infectious diseases like malaria and swine flu. Now, developing countries are ill-equipped to provide the long-term care needed for diabetes patients. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) projects one in three Americans will have diabetes by 2050. While diabetes awareness has increased in the U.S., more than 25 percent of Americans don’t even know they have it. Diane and her guests examine the causes and costs of the diabetes epidemic and efforts to reverse the trend.

Guests

  • Ann Albright director, division of diabetes translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Dr. Rita Kalyani assistant professor of medicine, Johns Hopkins University; and editor, Johns Hopkins Diabetes Guide
  • Dr. Judith Fradkin director, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, & Metabolic Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Leonor Guariguata epidemiologist, International Diabetes Federation
  • Maya Rockeymoore director, Leadership for Healthy Communities, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

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