In August 2010, the entire world watched a drama unfold in northern Chile. Thirty-three men were entombed half-a-mile underground when the San Jose copper mine collapsed. A rock the size of a skyscraper had sheared off the mountain above and blocked the miners’ access to the surface. After seventeen days — as hopes for their survival began to dim — the men were discovered alive. For seven weeks, engineers and emergency workers worked around the clock to bring the men to the surface. One American journalist gained exclusive access to the rescue operation and the trapped miners. To mark the first anniversary of the miners’ rescue on October 13th, we are rebroadcasting Diane’s interview with Jonathan Franklin, who tells the story of their dramatic ordeal and its aftermath.

Guests

  • Jonathan Franklin award-winning journalist who reports for "The Washington Post," "The Guardian," and "Der Spiegal," among other publications. He lives in Santiago, Chile.

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Related Video

60 Minutes recently interviewed several of the 33 Chilean miners about the many challenges they are facing in the aftermath of their rescue:

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