Political debate aside, an increasing number of environmental scientists believe unprecedented change in our climate is coming. The future they envisage is one where wars fought over food and water and spiking oil prices are the norm. This, together with dramatic ecological changes, such as the melting ice caps, widespread drought and loss of biodiversity will bring humanity to the brink of collapse. It’s a grim scenario, but according to my guests today, this threatened global and economic crisis could actually pave the way for enormous positive change. As part of our Environmental Outlook series we look at how it may be possible not just to adapt to climate change, but embrace it.

Guests

  • Michael MacCracken chief scientist, Climate Institute.
  • Amy Seidl author and lecturer in Environmental Studies, University of Vermont.
  • Paul Gilding author, former executive director of Greenpeace International and founder of the environmental consulting firm ECOS.

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