Readers' Review: "Invisible" by Paul Auster

Author Paul Auster poses for a portrait in Brooklyn's Park Slope neighborhood in New York, Nov. 9, 1995.  - AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Author Paul Auster poses for a portrait in Brooklyn's Park Slope neighborhood in New York, Nov. 9, 1995.

AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Readers' Review: "Invisible" by Paul Auster

Diane leads a discussion about a novel by one of America's most provocative writers. Paul Auster's "Invisible" is a sometimes shocking story of seduction and betrayal, which pushes the borders between truth and memory, narration and identity.

For this month's Readers' Review, we selected a novel by the contemporary American writer Paul Auster. "Invisible" - set in New York and Paris - unfolds in four parts with changing narrators and perspectives. It's a crime thriller, a sexual exposé and a coming-of-age story. It begins in the intellectually charged atmosphere of Columbia University in 1967. A student and aspiring poet befriends a volatile and mysterious professor. Shortly after, shocking events occur. They haunt the younger man for the rest of his life. We'll talk about truth and imagination - and how memory affects us all.

Guests

Mark Athitakis

writer, editor, critic and blogger.

Lisa Page

president of the PEN/Faulkner Foundation and creative writing teacher at George Washington University.

Neely Tucker

staff writer for The Washington Post magazine; author, "Love in the Driest Season," a memoir of adopting a baby in Zimbabwe.

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