Crisis in Egypt

Bread vendors pull their trolley to their shop in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb.2, 2011. Egypt's economy suffered a fresh blow after yet another credit agency lowered its ratings and its currency approached a five-year low with slim chance of a quick rebound amid surging street protests.  - AP Photo/Victoria Hazou

Bread vendors pull their trolley to their shop in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Feb.2, 2011. Egypt's economy suffered a fresh blow after yet another credit agency lowered its ratings and its currency approached a five-year low with slim chance of a quick rebound amid surging street protests.

AP Photo/Victoria Hazou

Crisis in Egypt

The U-S, Israel, and much of the Arab world are watching anxiously as events continue to unfold in Egypt: An update on demands of protesters and efforts to restore calm.

Opposition leaders in Egypt say the government must go further. Yesterday, Egypt’s vice president and long time intelligence chief met with representatives of opposition groups including members of the Muslim Brotherhood. He pledged open elections and the release of political prisoners, but did not address the fundamental sticking point, President Mubarak himself. For days now protesters in Egypt have insisted on Mubarak’s immediate resignation, and they vow to escalate their protests until their demands are met: Join us for an update on the political turmoil in Egypt and what role, if any, the U.S. can play

Guests

Steven Cook

Hasib J. Sabbagh senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies,
Council on Foreign Relations

Abderrahim Foukara

Washington bureau chief of Al Jazeera Arabic.

Emad Shahin

Egyptian scholar and associate professor of
political science, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
University of Notre Dame

Shashank Bengali

Cairo correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers.

Please familiarize yourself with our Code of Conduct and Terms of Use before posting your comments.

Our address has changed!

The Diane Rehm Show is produced by member-supported WAMU 88.5 in Washington DC.