When President Lyndon Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act into law in 1967, he said its purpose was ‘to enrich man’s spirit.’ The Act established the Corporation for Public Broadcasting – and provided funds for educational television and radio. More than four decades later, public broadcasting networks like NPR and PBS have influenced the lives of millions of Americans. But in today’s saturated media marketplace, some critics say public broadcasting has outlived both its mandate and the justification for continued public funding. Diane and her guests discuss the future of public broadcasting.


  • Vivian Schiller President and CEO of NPR
  • Kevin Brady U. S. House of Representatives (R-TX)
  • Patricia Harrison President and CEO of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB)
  • Paula Kerger President and CEO of the Public Broadcasting System (PBS)

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