Encouraging Civility in Political Debates

President Barack Obama takes part in a conference call in the Situation Room of the White House concerning the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and others in Tucson, Az., Saturday, Jan. 8, 2011. Pictured, left to right, National Security Advisor Tom Donilon, incoming Chief of Staff Bill Daley, Deputy Chief of Staff Jim Messina, Director of Communications Dan Pfeiffer, and Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs Phil Schiliro. Also taking part in the call were Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr., Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, and FBI Director Robert Mueller. - Official White House photo by Pete Souza via Flickr

President Barack Obama takes part in a conference call in the Situation Room of the White House concerning the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and others in Tucson, Az., Saturday, Jan. 8, 2011. Pictured, left to right, National Security Advisor Tom Donilon, incoming Chief of Staff Bill Daley, Deputy Chief of Staff Jim Messina, Director of Communications Dan Pfeiffer, and Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs Phil Schiliro. Also taking part in the call were Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr., Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, and FBI Director Robert Mueller.

Official White House photo by Pete Souza via Flickr

Encouraging Civility in Political Debates

A recent poll shows Americans tend to believe all major political groups go too far in using inflammatory language. Diane invite you to share ideas on how to encourage civility in our public debates.

The nation paused last week to remember the victims of a shooting spree in Arizona. At a memorial in Tuscon, President Obama urged all Americans to use the tragedy as a reason to expand our moral imagination …to talk to each other in a way that heals rather than wounds. Police portrayed the alleged shooter as mentally unstable with no political ties. But the attempted assassination of a member of Congress brought attention to the rise of partisan rancor in recent years. Many lawmakers are now calling for a more civil tone in our political debates. We invite you to share your ideas on how to encourage civility in our communities.

Guests

James Fallows

national correspondent for the "Atlantic Monthly."

Jill Lepore

professor of American History and chair of the History and Literature Program at Harvard University. She is also a staff writer at The New Yorker and author, most recently, of "The Whites of Their Eyes."

Glenn Nye

former representative of the Second District of Virginia in the U.S. House.

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