A Texas judge this week declared Cornelius Dupree an innocent man, clearing him thirty years after he was wrongfully accused of rape and robbery. More than two-hundred-sixty Americans have been exonerated by DNA evidence since nineteen-eight-nine. Many, like Cornelius Dupree, were victims of eyewitness misidentification. In other cases, improper forensic science, false confessions, or unreliable snitches played a role. The criminal justice community is trying new ways to avoid false imprisonment– from independent investigations to post-conviction case reviews. Using DNA to overturn wrongful convictions.

Guests

  • Craig Watkins District Attorney of Dallas County, Texas
  • Ken Cuccinelli Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Virginia
  • John Bradley District Attorney, Williamson County, Texas
  • William Thompson Professor of Criminology, Law, and Society Psychology& Social Behavior at the School of Ecology at the University of California, Irvine
  • Shawn Armbrust Executive Director of The Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project

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